Drop It Like It’s Hot: Plum and Rosemary Tarte Tatin

Published August 3, 2014 by The Feminist

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I know what you’re all thinking: Why the hell is she linking a delicious tarte tatin with dirty, feminist-infuriating Snoop Dog lyrics?

It is indeed a reasonable question to ask. But fear not, fellow feminists: I have not yet lost my feminist-ranting skills, I just thought the term “drop it like it’s hot” actually describes really well the mental horror one has to go through in order to dare and flip a tarte tatin.

If you have ever tried to make one, you will definitely be able to relate to the following description: You take your hot pan out of the oven… and you leave it to rest for a couple of seconds… while you figure out the best way to flip that flaming hot pan… and to make sure the tarte tatin remains intact… and that it doesn’t start leaking hot caramel juices onto your palms… or drop to the floor…

I’m sure some of you think this is a highly familiar scenario. I love baking, I do. And honestly, I am quite good at it. But I am –hand on heart- as clumsy as Bridget Jones trying to hoist herself into a pair of shaping underwear. I drop things on a regular basis. I constantly knock things over. I sometimes trip over my own feet while waiting in line at the drug store (seriously, how is that even possible?).

Hence, flipping things upside down is not my forte.

So there I was, staring from the hot pan, to the plate on which it was supposed to end up, back to my hands and arms that were appointed the dreadful task of having to flip the pan over.

Damn, I really should have considered working on my arm muscles at the gym!

I felt my heart beat inside my throat. My hands were shaky and drops of sweat were gathering on my forehead.

I counted to three.

One.

Two.

Three.

I flipped the pan, eyes closed.

The delicious tarte tatin almost ended on the floor. Almost.

I nearly burnt myself on the hot pan. Nearly.

But even though it was touch and go, that brilliant tarte tatin made it onto the plate safe and sound.

Cheers for me!

If you are like me (i.e. a clumsy chick with zero arm muscles), it might seem too much of a daunting predicament to put yourself through in order to get a dessert on a plate. However, this plum and rosemary tarte tatin is worth it. The tangy and sharp plum marries perfectly with the fragrant rosemary and the sweet caramel melts it all together with a heavenly comforting touch. Add to that some crisp puff pastry (hurray, it wasn’t soggy!) and some fresh Greek yoghurt rippled with honey to go on top and you just know that the grand flip-the-hot-pan adventure will soon be forgotten…

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Plum and rosemary Tarte Tatin

Ingredients:

  • 9-10 plums, cut in half
  • Sheet of puff pastry
  • 60gr caster sugar
  • 40gr muscovado sugar
  • 50gr butter
  • 2 tbsp fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp Cointreau
  • 1 tsp corn flour
  • 100gr Greek yoghurt
  • 2 tbsp honey

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Melt the butter in a large pan and add the two types of sugar. Slowly let it dissolve into a lovely caramel. Stir in the Cointreau mixed with the corn flour and let it bubble for a couple of seconds. Sprinkle in the rosemary. Put the halved plums into the caramel, cut-side down, and top with the puff pastry. (Make sure the pastry is nicely tucked into the edges of the pan.
  2. Put in the oven for 20-25 minutes until golden brown.
  3. Meanwhile mix the yoghurt with the honey.
  4. Remove the hot pan from the oven and let it cool for a couple of minutes before flipping/serving. (if you see that there is a lot of liquid in the pan, try and scoop it out a little bit before flipping.) Flip the tarte tatin onto its head and onto a nice plate. Garnish with a couple of rosemary twigs and serve with a dollop of Greek yoghurt.
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8 comments on “Drop It Like It’s Hot: Plum and Rosemary Tarte Tatin

  • Lovely looking Tarte tatin and interesting account. You’ve done a good job capturing the intensity of the ‘tarte-fipping’ moment, by referring to every moment in a gradual progression…Thanks also for the recipe (I, for one, am definitely going to give it a try…)

  • MMm, I like that you put rosemary! I keep meaning to cook with it, but reluctant to buy it, when we have rosemary growing on the side of the road. But I’m reluctant to use it, so I end up not getting rosemary into the kitchen.

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